For open (Source: National Monuments Record, 1982. Available

For example, the Museum of Liverpool and the mid-rise residential towers at Mann Island (Proctor 2017, pers. com.). 
Figure 6: Map showing zone 1 of Liverpool’s WHS – Pier Head, home to the Three Graces (Liverpool Building, Cunard Building and, Port of Liverpool Building), adjacent to modern introductions like Museum of Liverpool and the development at Mann Island (Source: Liverpool Maritime Mercantile City World Heritage Site Masterplan 2017-2024,2017: 8. Available at http://liverpool.gov.uk/media/1356187/pmd-486-liverpool-whs-management-plan-final-version-as-at-27-sep-2017.pdf) Module 2 (0923294): Are Conservation and Development Mutually Exclusive in the Historic Urban Landscape? A Study of Liverpool and Vienna. 
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Figure 7: Liverpool’s skyline as seen from the waterfront – a blend of modern architecture like the Museum of Liverpool’ building (right), and iconic historic buildings like the Three Graces (left) (Source: Liverpool City Region Local Enterprise Partnership, no date. Available at https://www.placenorthwest.co.uk/news/liverpools-tourism-market-continues-to-expand/) 
Figure 8: Aerial view of Liverpool’s waterfront – from Pier Head to Albert Docks, and the historic as well as contemporary landmarks within its limits (Source: Mann Island Premier Apartments, 2016. Available at http://mannisland.info/) 
Figure 9: The Three Graces in the backdrop of contemporary architectural introductions like the Museum of Liverpool (left) and the mid-rise residential towers at Mann Island in Liverpool (Source: Mann Island Premier Apartments, 2016. Available at http://mannisland.info/) Module 2 (0923294): Are Conservation and Development Mutually Exclusive in the Historic Urban Landscape? A Study of Liverpool and Vienna. 
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Figure 10: Zone 2 of the UNESCO WHS of Liverpool Maritime Mercantile City – Albert Dock (Source: Liverpool Maritime Mercantile City World Heritage Site Management Plan 2017-2024, 2017: 10. Available at http://liverpool.gov.uk/media/1356187/pmd-486-liverpool-whs-management-plan-final-version-as-at-27-sep-2017.pdf) Module 2 (0923294): Are Conservation and Development Mutually Exclusive in the Historic Urban Landscape? A Study of Liverpool and Vienna. 
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Figure 11:Albert Dock Block E in 1982, derelict and silted up after the dock gates were left open (Source: National Monuments Record, 1982. Available on http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/maritime/research/mappingmemory/themes/memories/memory-45.html) 
Figure 12: Aerial view of the regenerated Albert Dock, home to Liverpool City Region’s Visitor Centre (Source: Easton, C. no date. Available at http://www.albertdock.com/magic-in-the-air-at-albert-dock-liverpool/) Module 2 (0923294): Are Conservation and Development Mutually Exclusive in the Historic Urban Landscape? A Study of Liverpool and Vienna. 
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Figure 13: Zone 3 of Liverpool’s WHS – the northern docks including Princes Dock, Stanley Dock and Bramley Moore Dock among others (Source: Liverpool Maritime Mercantile City World Heritage Site Management Plan 2017-2024, 2017: 12. Available at http://liverpool.gov.uk/media/1356187/pmd-486-liverpool-whs-management-plan-final-version-as-at-27-sep-2017.pdf Module 2 (0923294): Are Conservation and Development Mutually Exclusive in the Historic Urban Landscape? A Study of Liverpool and Vienna. 
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Figure 14: The award-winning Titanic Hotel – An historic regeneration project that has conserved and converted the once derelict Northern Warehouse at Stanley Dock into a boutique hotel (Source: Titanic Hotel Liverpool, no date. Available at http://www.titanichotelliverpool.com/) 
Not only has the Titanic hotel given a new lease of life to a building previously on Historic England’s At Risk Register, it also exemplifies principles of sustainable development through its heritage led development process, fostering a “sensitive design approach” (Civic Trust Awards, no date) and, supporting skill development through collaborations with local Universities thus enabling local businesses to hire locally (YBnews, 2014). 
Thus, Liverpool has already shown us that heritage conservation and regeneration can function as a facilitator of modern development – an idea that resonates with the UN’s 2030 Agenda for sustainable development through accomplishing the 17 SDGs (UNESCO, no date). However, at present, developmental goals largely driven by economic interests are seemingly taking precedence in the city’s decisions (Blandford 2017, pers. com.).