Often She is scared for the consequences or

Often mothers feel the need to protect their family, keep them safe from harm, and make sure they are doing the right things. Throughout the play “Death of a Salesman” by Arthur Miller, Linda’s character is often motherly-like, and like a mother she feels the need to protect her family. She is the person that is keeping the family together. She cares for her husband, and choses to protect him from all the dangers of the outside world. She is scared for the consequences or what could happen when Willy sees what’s really out there. But what Linda does not realize is that her protection of Willy is doing the opposite of what she really intends to do. Linda’s protection is problematic in Willy’s life. It is doing too much harm, and is hurting Willy and their future as a family. Linda’s protection of Willy is important because it protects Willy’s self worth and relationships temporarily; however this protection shields him from reality, thus creates bigger problems for him. Linda’s protection of Willy is important because it is solving the endless feud between Willy and his son, Biff. In the essay “Family Values in Death of a Salesman” Centolla explains that Willy loves his family very much, and most of the things he does is for them, especially Biff. In the essay Centolla says, “Willy values his family more than his life” (Centolla 29). Willy and Biff had a very special bond between them. Something no other member of the Loman family has. That night in Boston, when Biff shows up at Willy’s hotel to ask Willy to get his math credit, he shows up to the scene of Willy’s affair. After that day Biff could no longer look at Willy the same. That day marks the end of their bond and the beginning of their feud. But Linda does not know that, so she tries hard to repair it. When Biff comes home from a long time of no communication, Linda is constantly talking to Biff. Linda says, “And what happened to the love you had for him. You were such pals! How you used to talk on the phone every night. How lonely he was til he could come home to you!” (Death of a Salesman 54). In response Biff says, “I mean to change, I’m tryin’, mom, you understand” (57). Biff realizes how his actions affect their relationship, and tries to change. Linda shows Biff how his actions affect his relationship with Willy, and that he should change. Linda’s protection of Willy is important because it helps solve the feud between Biff and Willy temporarily. Linda’s protection of Willy is problematic because it becomes a hindrance to Willy and Biff’s relationship. Linda does try hard to help their relationship, but she only temporarily aids it. When Willy is talking to Linda about Biff, he often contradicts himself. Most of the time Linda goes along with what Willy is saying instead of correcting him. When Linda does not say anything Willy continues to get angry towards Biff. An example is when Willy is talking to Linda about Biff. In the play he says, “Biff Loman is lost. In the most greatest country in the world, a young man with such personal attractiveness gets lost. And such a hard worker, there one thing about Biff, he’s not Lazy. Linda: Never” (16). In this dialogue Linda just says never. Linda knows that Biff is not what Willy set him out to be. But instead of telling him she goes along, to eventually add to the dispute. When Linda is does not say anything, she is not letting Willy know his anger towards Biff is wrong. Linda also puts the blame of Willy suicidal thoughts on Biff because she thinks her sons have turned their backs on him. In the play Linda says, “… but I tell you he’s put his whole life into you and you’ve turned your backs on him. (She is bent over the chair, weeping, her head in her hands). Biff, I swear to God! Biff, his life is in your hands!” (59-60). Linda’s protection is troublesome to their relationship, because she doesn’t understand Willy’s guilt, so instead of solving the dispute as a family, she finds the only way is to let the blame be on Biff. Biff doesn’t know how to help Willy, and because he feels he is to blame, he feels angry at his father. Linda’s protection of Willy is important because it is hiding Willy from his reality and self worth. Willy Loman lives in a world filled with illusions and reality. Linda is always supportive of Willy’s dreams, and knows that if they were not to happen he would be very depressed. By letting Willy’s illusions get mixed up with his reality, she is letting his dreams of being a salesman be true. She believes that letting these illusions continue will make him joyous. An example is when in the play Willy and Linda are at home together and Willy says, “Gee whiz! That’s really somethin’. I’m gonna knock Howard for a loop, kid. I’ll get an advance and I’ll come home with a New York job. Goddammit, now I’m gonna do it! Linda: Oh, that’s the spirit Willy!” (75). Linda is trying to boost and encourage Willy to continue his dream. She is being a supportive wife, and by doing that she is helping Willy live his dreams. Another example is when Willy’s brother Ben offers him a job in Alaska, Linda opposes the job offer and would rather have Willy stay, because she knows Willy will regret losing his dream. In the play it states: Willy: but in alaska, kid I could -. Linda: You’re doing well enough, Willy! Ben, to Linda: Enough for what, my dear? Linda, (frightened of Ben and angry at him): Don’t say those things to him! Enough to be happy right here, right now. To Willy, while Ben laughs: Why must everybody conquer the world? You’re well liked and the boys love you and someday – to Ben – Why, old man Wagner told him just the other day that if he keeps it up he’ll be a member of the firm, didn’t he, Willy? (85). Linda is frightened of the thought of Willy leaving and losing his dream. She opposes Ben’s offer in order to keep Willy’s dream. Linda’s protection of Willy is important because she is keeping Willy’s dream alive. Linda’s protection of Willy is problematic because she is hiding Willy from his reality and self worth. In the play it states: Willy: but in alaska, kid I could -. Linda: You’re doing well enough, Willy! Ben, to Linda: Enough for what, my dear? Linda, (frightened of Ben and angry at him): Don’t say those things to him! Enough to be happy right here, right now. To Willy, while Ben laughs: Why must everybody conquer the world? You’re well liked and the boys love you and someday – to Ben – Why, old man Wagner told him just the other day that if he keeps it up he’ll be a member of the firm, didn’t he, Willy? (85).When Linda opposes Ben’s job offer, she is also failing to guide Willy through recognition of reality. Willy’s job isn’t paying well and Linda knows that. Her protection caused Willy a chance of a well paying job to support his family. Willy is going through contrast moments of buoyancy and depression, Willy going through these different degree of emotions is what ultimately causes him to asunder. Also by Linda protecting Willy and hiding him from reality she assist Willy in an unrealistic vision. Lindas protection of Willy is a botheration because she is supporting an impracticable dream which eventually tears him up. Lindas protection of Willy is important because she gives him a reason to not commit suicide. Linda is a loving and doting wife. Linda’s love is what probably would have saved Willy from killing himself. She knows how irrational Willy can be, but by her being there for him she is protecting Willy. In the play Linda says, “I’m—I’m ashamed to. How can I mention it to him? Every day I go down and take away that little rubber pipe. But when he comes home, I put it back where it was. How can I insult him that way?… I know every thought in his mind. It sounds so old-fashioned and silly…” (59-60). Linda knows Willy’s secret but instead of confronting him, she goes along with him, and is there every step of the way. Linda is driven by despair and terror, she protects Willy so that day won’t ever come. Linda’s protection of Willy is important because it is a reason why Willy would halt rom his suicide. Linda’s protection of Willy is problematic because it is one downfall to his death. Linda knows Willy’s dream is irrational, Charley lends him money, Willy is suicidal, and has attempted to kill himself multiple times before. But after all that knowledge she still does not have the courage to adress Willy. She walks on eggs in order to not boil his blood. She reproaches Biff and Happy when they raise his temper because she knows he has avery fragile self esteem and mind, which could result in his suicide. She would rather hide all her knowledge to not bend Willy’s mental state of being, then get him the help he needs. In the Play Linda says: “I’m—I’m ashamed to. How can I mention it to him? Every day I go down and take away that little rubber pipe. But when he comes home, I put it back where it was. How can I insult him that way? I don’t know what to do” (59-60). By Linda keeping her knowledge and truth of Willy’s actions, and continuously putting the rubber pipe back into place, she is knowingly accepting Willy’s suicide and allowing the death to occur. Linda’s protection is problematic because she is letting Wily fall to his death. Linda fears reckoning Willy’s image, so she keeps quite. She conceals his insecurities. Her devotion to her husband makes it hard for her to understand what she has done to Willy and why no one has come to his funeral. Linda unknowingly knows why, but finds hard to admit to. Her Protection of Willy is temporarily important, but is overall problematic because it results in the feud between Biff and Willy, allows his self worth to be altered by illusions of reality, and contributes to the death of Willy Loman.